Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM)

Distinguished Conduct Medal.  A circular, silver medal, 1.42 inches in diameter.

Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM)

Contributors

Context

The DCM was created on 04 December 1854, because of the Crimea War and was first awarded to a Canadian on 19 April 1901.

Eligibility and Criteria

The Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) was awarded to Warrant Officers, non-commissioned officers, and non-commissioned members, serving in any of the sovereign's military forces, for distinguished conduct in the field. It was the second highest award for gallantry in action (after the Victoria Cross) for all army ranks below commissioned officers and was available to Navy and Air Force personnel also for distinguished conduct in the field.

Description

A circular, silver medal, 1.42 inches in diameter. For mounting an ornate scroll suspender is attached to the medal by a single-toe claw.

Medal obverse:

King Edward VII: uncrowned, in Field Marshal's uniform, facing left, with the legend EDWARDVS VII REX IMPERATOR

King George V: uncrowned, in Field Marshal's uniform, facing left, with the legend GEORGIVS V BRITT: OMN: REX ET IND: IMP:

King George VI:

1. A crowned effigy, facing left, with the legend: GEORGIVS VI D: G: BR: OMN: REX ET INDIAE IMP: (for the Second World War)

2. A crowned effigy, facing left, with the legend: GEORGIVS VI DEI GRA: BRITT: OMN: REX FID: DEF: (for Korea) BIU

Medals issued to Canadians in Korea were the second type King George VI, rather than Elizabeth the Second (EIIR) medals.

The reverse shows FOR/DISTINGUISHED/CONDUCT/IN THE FIELD in four lines, with a horizontal line through a small oval wreath below the wording. Some Edward VII medals had the word CANADA above the inscription.

The crimson ribbon is 1.25 inches wide with a dark blue central stripe.

Bars

A silver, laurelled bar was awarded for a subsequent act or acts of distinguished conduct in the field.

Historical Notes

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