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5.0 OVERARCHING CONCLUSIONS

Each phase of the evaluation provided assessments of core aspects of the NVC. However, the evaluation was designed such that aspects from the first and second phases could be further evaluated in subsequent phases to reinforce findings and strengthen conclusions. Several findings of phase three are consistent with, and reinforce findings from earlier phases of the evaluation. These are outlined below.

  • Issue
    Performance Measurement
    Conclusion
    Appropriate data needs to be collected to measure value-for-money, and attribution of program participation and/or completion to achievement of program outcomes.
    Phase I
    Additional work required to clarify the outcome relating to “stable health” and that the Department needed to begin collecting and analyzing performance measurement information for all NVC programs.
    Phase II
    Require a performance measurement plan for Outreach.
    Phase III
    Evaluated the NVC outcomes, which are different than the outcomes of the individual programs.
    Difficult to assess progress and inform decision making when there are both overall NVC and individual program outcomes, and they do not align well.
  • Issue
    Families
    Conclusion
    There was to be more family focus with the NVC suite of programs; however, this shift has not occurred.
    Phase I
    • Identified a disconnect between the expected results for families and the legislative authority, resulting in staff confusion regarding VAC’s role in meeting the needs of families.
    • Phase I and III also noted spouses could benefit from CTS.
    • Provide additional support for Veterans and families who cannot afford to access the Health Benefits Program.
    Phase II
    • A Veteran with transitioning issues has an impact on the family and its functioning.
    • Families are often instrumental in having the Veteran seek assistance; therefore improving outreach to families is critical.
    Phase III
    • Focus group participants felt that it was important to recognize the family dimension is an important part of life both during and after a career in the CF.
    • Statistical treatment data related to families indicates minimal involvement.
    • Released CF members requiring rehabilitation were identified as being at greatest risk of low income.
    • Gaps were identified in the benefits for seriously disabled Veterans and are being addressed.(eval DA/DP)
  • Issue
    Rehabilitation Program
    Conclusion
    Changes to the program are needed to reflect the segment of Veterans that require long-term support.
    Phase I
    A significant number of Veterans were requiring support for longer periods of time than was anticipated in order to maximize function or reduce the deterioration of function.
    Phase III
    Confirmed issues with the Rehabilitation Program: the present program requires changes to more effectively and efficiently meet the needs of the entire population.
  • Issue
    Career Transition Services (formerly Job Placement Program)
    Conclusion
    The workshops are the only component that is required and it offers value-for-money
    Phase I
    • Similarities with the CTS and other federal department programs.
    • Needs assessment required
    • Low utilization brings into question the current design and delivery of the program
    Phase III
    Minimal value-for-money being derived from the career counselling and job finding components of the CTS Program; the workshop component has been well attended and offers good value for money

In conclusion, the findings of NVC Phase III are consistent with, and further reinforce findings from earlier phases. More data is necessary to measure satisfaction and attribution of program participation and/or completion to achievement of program outcomes. The intended family focus of the NVC suite of programs has not been fully achieved as expected and changes are required in the design of the Rehabilitation Program to more adequately reflect the mix of participants. The Department participates in a wide range of outreach activities however; gaps remain concerning NVC outreach activities for previously released members and families. There are also opportunities to reassess the delivery of the CTS and vocational rehabilitation within VAC.

The Evaluation of DA/DP identified that at the lowest levels of disability, recipients may be better off financially under the NVC than they were prior to its implementation. However, more needed to be done for individuals at the higher levels of disability and this is currently being addressed through increased allowances for seriously disabled Veterans.

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