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362 results returned for First World War
Feeding The Troops was Big Business

Feeding The Troops was Big Business

Mr. Burton describes the precision with which rations were given out to the troops.

Burial At Sea

Burial At Sea

Mr. Burton discusses being asked to share the responsibility for communications with the convoy's lead cruiser. His first official wartime duty is to alert the convoy of a planned five minute stop to conduct a burial at sea.

Voyage Overseas

Voyage Overseas

Mr. Burton describes sailing from Halifax in a convoy of troop ships. He describes the evasive tactics used to minimize U-boat attacks, and finishes by describing being met by British destroyers who escort them to Liverpool.

Shortsightedness Was No Obstacle!

Shortsightedness Was No Obstacle!

Mr. Burton discusses he and his friends' decision to enlist. He's found to be shortsighted, but the examining officer retests him after making him wait beside the vision chart for a half hour. He passes the retest!

Sergeant As a Father Figure

Sergeant As a Father Figure

Mr. Henley describes an amusing incident in which his sergeant, an older, family man, steers him away from a brothel.

“Blighties” and a Good Sleep

“Blighties” and a Good Sleep

Mr. Henley discusses the fact that a 'blighty', a condition or wound requiring hospitalization in England, offered everyone a good night's sleep. However, his rehab requires being awakened at 4 am every morning to have his leg wound irrigated.

Wounded By A “Potato Masher”

Wounded By A “Potato Masher”

Mr. Henley describes how the Germans tied several 'potato masher' grenades together to increase their potential for damage, and how he and his officer were badly wounded by one of these devices.

'Not Diagnosed' And 'Self-Inflicted' Wounds

'Not Diagnosed' And 'Self-Inflicted' Wounds

Mr. Henley discusses the fact that soldiers with psychological trauma were labeled 'ND'– not diagnosed. He also describes self-inflicted wounds as a way to escape the front line, and some methods used in self-injury.

Money And A Peep Show

Money And A Peep Show

Mr. Henley describes how the Canadians and Australians kept their distance from one another on paydays, and how he and his kilted buddies would treat the girls at dockside by standing on the ship's upper deck when they were going on or returning from leave.

Whiz-Bang In The Latrine

Whiz-Bang In The Latrine

Mr. Henley recounts with amusement how an officer everyone disliked had the latrine he was using blown up by a German whiz-bang.

Don't Mess With Me!

Don't Mess With Me!

Mr. Henley discusses the status he held as a Sergeant-Major, and how his NCO's rallied around him when his authority was threatened by a new officer.

A Lesson Learned

A Lesson Learned

Mr. Henley describes the consequences of not sharing a parcel from home when sharing was the accepted practice.

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