Language selection

Search

Search

(advanced search)
Advanced Search Options

Search Results

362 results returned for First World War
Dreadful Living Conditions

Dreadful Living Conditions

Mr. Henley discusses being filthy, living with louse infested rats, and having last dibs on rations if you were in the front line.

Kilts Were Dreadful

Kilts Were Dreadful

Mr. Henley describes two major issues with kilts. The first was that lice thrived in a kilt's seams, and the second was that mud froze to a kilts tail, thus badly chafing its wearer's legs.

Canadians

Canadians

Mr. Henley discusses inadequacies of Canadian gear: tunics that weren't practical or warm, the Ross rifle which jammed after a few shots, and boots and leather belts which rotted in the wet conditions.

Creeping Barrage At Vimy Ridge

Creeping Barrage At Vimy Ridge

Mr. Henley gives an excellent description of the logistics and technique of the creeping barrage and its overwhelming success at Vimy Ridge.

The Somme Was A Killing Ground

The Somme Was A Killing Ground

Mr. Henley describes how the Germans set their barbed wire in such a way that Allied soldiers were lured towards enemy machine gun positions, and describes the resulting carnage.

Joining The Quebec Regiment

Joining The Quebec Regiment

Mr. Henley describes his transfer from a mounted to infantry regiment, and the shocking difference between the two uniforms.

Sailing To England

Sailing To England

Mr. Henley describes sailing to England aboard the SS Welshman during which he is in charge of the mules and horses, for which he receives premium pay. An offer of extra money to clean the ship afterward is ungraciously declined.

Railway Battalion in France

Railway Battalion in France

Mr. Martin briefly describes how the allies narrow gauge railway tracks were laid, and how numerous shell holes limited the range of the lines.

German Citizens were Welcoming and Cooperative.

German Citizens were Welcoming and Cooperative.

Mr. McLeod discusses the Army of Occupation being billeted in German homes during the winter. He describes sharing food with civilians and, in his case, feeling welcomed like family by his German hosts.

Armistice and Six Days Grace

Armistice and Six Days Grace

Mr. McLeod describes the six day withdrawal grace period granted to the German army after the Armistice. As the Allies advance to occupy Germany, they almost catch the Germans.

German Tears Over a Cheap Watch

German Tears Over a Cheap Watch

Mr. McLeod describes taking a number of German prisoners during an advance. He takes a cheap watch from a prisoner, who cries over the loss. Mr. McLeod reminds the captive that the outcome for him could have been far worse.

Rest Area Shelled

Rest Area Shelled

Mr. McLeod describes being on rest leave behind the lines, and the camp being struck by German artillery. Several deaths occur because of the shelling.

Date modified: