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34 results returned within campaign Vimy
The Journey Begins

The Journey Begins

The Journey Begins. The time has finally arrived! Our Canadian Delegation of Veterans and youth set out in one of the greatest journeys of a lifetime – the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

Creeping Barrage At Vimy Ridge

Creeping Barrage At Vimy Ridge

Mr. Henley gives an excellent description of the logistics and technique of the creeping barrage and its overwhelming success at Vimy Ridge.

Barbed wire inspections

Barbed wire inspections

Mr. Stokes briefly describes nocturnal inspections of protective barbed wire for possible German sabotage.

Vimy Ridge Was Decisive

Vimy Ridge Was Decisive

Mr. Boyce describes the value of tunnels to the eventual success of the Canadian assault on Vimy, and discusses the demoralization of the defeated German prisoners.

Canteens and estaminets

Canteens and estaminets

Mr. Bond describes several aspects of camp life.

Captive balloons shot down

Captive balloons shot down

Mr. Bourne describes an attack by a German fighter which destroys three observation balloons, and then attacks a machine gun position. Ironically, the German is shot down by Allied triplanes returning from a similar raid behind German lines.

German bombers

German bombers

Mr. Bourne describes his role in moving supplies from behind the lines to forward positions for dispersal. He describes the risk of being bombed, as well as being armed for infantry combat.

Holding the front near Vimy

Holding the front near Vimy

Mr. Ganong gives a brief description of his service in Europe with emphasis on Vimy. In particular, he discusses the weather and the barrage preceding the Vimy assault.

No Man’s Land

No Man’s Land

Mr. Smith describes the retaking of Vimy Ridge, and being wounded by shrapnel after reaching the Chalk Pit.

My steel helmet saved me

My steel helmet saved me

Mr. Turner describes the role of his pocket knife and helmet in saving his life.

You never know your luck

You never know your luck

Mr. Turner discusses the fatalism that crept into the soldiers’ conversations, and gives a couple examples of predictions of death coming true

The Americans

The Americans

Mr. Wood describes the animosity between Canadian and American soldiers, based on the higher wages earned by U.S. soldiers inflating prices beyond what most Canadian troops could afford.

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