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19 results returned within campaign Somme
The Somme Was A Killing Ground

The Somme Was A Killing Ground

Mr. Henley describes how the Germans set their barbed wire in such a way that Allied soldiers were lured towards enemy machine gun positions, and describes the resulting carnage.

Heavy losses at the front

Heavy losses at the front

Mr. Gies recalls arriving at the front line and remaining static for the first month. After a German breakthrough at the Somme, his unit is sent to help repel them. In the ensuing action, four-fifths of his unit are either killed or wounded.

The Somme – Roles Reversed

The Somme – Roles Reversed

Mr. Boyce discusses the Battle of the Somme as being the point where the Allies switched from defensive to offensive strategies.

Intuition

Intuition

Mr. Stevenson describes how his corporal’s instinct saved their lives during a barrage, and burying the dead in shell holes as part of a burial party.

Limbers

Limbers

Mr. Stevenson describes the mule driven limber, a wheeled vehicle used to transport artillery to and from the front. He describes a shelling incident and its impact on the mules

A solid line of horses

A solid line of horses

Mr. Stevenson describes a cavalry assault on a German emplacement at the Somme, with many casualties on both sides. He also describes the uncontested capture of a German troop train during the same foray.

In the mud

In the mud

Mr. Copp describes the effects of fatigue depleting his Company’s ranks during a forced march to Mametz after five days in action at the Somme.

Ammunition train

Ammunition train

Mr. Vale describes the method used to establish ammunition dumps in the front lines by way of narrow gauge rail lines, their vulnerability to being bombed, and his role as a machine gunner in protecting unarmed ammunition details.

I flew into a shell hole

I flew into a shell hole

Mr. Vale describes being on cavalry patrol, being spotted by an observation balloon and being shelled with shrapnel bombs.

A lot of people drowned

A lot of people drowned

Mr. Conrad offers some general comments about the death toll at the Somme, the horrible conditions at Passchendaele, and concludes by describing in more specific detail his own living conditions.

Waste deep in dead bodies

Waste deep in dead bodies

Mr. Hatch describes a gruesome discovery while trying to locate a First Aid post in pitch darkness, witnessing terror, and sleeping with the enemy.

Hell on earth

Hell on earth

Mr. Hatch describes reaching their day’s objective, a bombed out sugar factory at Thiepville, and the devastation caused by a single shrapnel bomb.

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