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We Were Living Like Kings

We Were Living Like Kings

Mr. MacWhirter describes a soldier’s life in Kowloon and compares it with the squalor and misery of the local population.

We Felt That we Would not be There Long

We Felt That we Would not be There Long

Mr. MacWhirter describes an attack on Kowloon, fallback to Lai Moon, and the invasion of the island by the Japanese. He discusses the inadequacy of Canadian weapons.

There was Blood Running in That Water

There was Blood Running in That Water

Mr. MacWhirter discusses the futility of the Canadian combat strategy and the human cost of poor communications after the call to surrender.

Then They Started to get Tough

Then They Started to get Tough

Mr. MacWhirter describes the march to North Point camp and the bayoneting of the wounded. He also describes the murder of Chinese sympathizers as well as deteriorating conditions in the camp.

They Were Dying Right and Left

They Were Dying Right and Left

Mr. MacWhirter describes life at Sham Shui Po camp. He discusses diseases and being intimidated by the Kamloops Kid.

Sometimes I Dream About it, the Stink

Sometimes I Dream About it, the Stink

Mr. MacWhirter describes conditions on the Japanese ship, Tatuta Maru, while being shipped to the Omini labour camp in Japan.

Bill, you Want to Live?

Bill, you Want to Live?

Mr. MacWhirter describes his personal beatings and the long-term impact of the abuse. He also describes being forced to work with both feet broken and with serious gastrointestinal problems.

We Used a Mirror ‘til They Found Us

We Used a Mirror ‘til They Found Us

Mr. MacWhirter describes his sense of Japan’s approaching defeat, changes in the guard structure, and the good and bad results of the American supply drop.

We Became Brothers and we Still Are

We Became Brothers and we Still Are

Mr. MacWhirter describes the lasting impact of the friendships he made during his POW experiences.

I’m Scared Sometimes That I’ll Choke my Wife

I’m Scared Sometimes That I’ll Choke my Wife

Mr. MacWhirter describes the importance of his wife in his emotional recovery after the war, and his fear of injuring her during one of his recurring nightmares.

Every Veteran Should be Looked at and Respected

Every Veteran Should be Looked at and Respected

Mr. MacWhirter discusses the need to respect Veterans and our patriotic duty to serve in times of war. He feels that Canadian schools should be more focussed on patriotism.

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