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Going to Vancouver and the HMAS Awatea

Going to Vancouver and the HMAS Awatea

Mr. Whitman discusses boarding his train to leave for Vancouver and being denied visitors. After soldiers threaten to not go, their families are allowed to say goodbye. He arrives aboard HMAS Awatea just in time for another protest.

Japanese bomb Kowloon

Japanese bomb Kowloon

Mr. Whitman describes seeing a flight of aircraft approaching and thinking they are American. However, exploding bombs convince him the Japanese have declared war.

Japanese mortar assault

Japanese mortar assault

Mr. Whitman describes the Japanese zeroing in on his sentry post in a hotel, with knee mortars. The last and closest is fortunately a dud. He is restationed near the kitchen, where he has an unexpected feed of freshly cooked chicken.

Escape in sock feet

Escape in sock feet

Mr. Whitman describes leaving the hotel in sock feet in an effort to be as quiet as possible. When a machine gun opens fire, being noisy ceases to be an issue.

March to Fort Stanley

March to Fort Stanley

Mr. Whitman describes not being able to keep up on the march to Fort Stanley, due to malaria induced fatigue. He describes being shot at, but not caring because he is so ill.

Heavy shelling

Heavy shelling

Mr. Whitman describes being pinned down by Japanese artillery after leaving Fort Stanley, and having to listen as men die in a nearby building which had been struck by shells.

Dysentery was horrible.

Dysentery was horrible.

Mr. Whitman describes the filthy conditions in the POW camp's dysentery ward. He manages to be released from the hospital for his birthday, but after eating some meat, is hospitalized again.

Beri-beri symptoms

Beri-beri symptoms

Mr. Whitman describes the debilitating symptoms of beri-beri, and taking shots of thiamine as an antidote. The side effects of the injections are almost as uncomfortable.

American air raid

American air raid

Mr. Whitman describes the optimism spawned by American air raids, and having to curb his enthusiasm in order to not irritate the guards.

Insult to injury

Insult to injury

Mr. Whitman discusses going out on the town in Manila after he's liberated, and returning to his camp to find all of his money and belongings stolen.

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