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Mistaken Identity

Mistaken Identity

Mr. Warren, who enlisted with his identical twin brother, describes an ironic situation which occurs while training in a Link Trainer at High River, Alberta. Mr. Warren's twin is having trouble in this machine, and unbeknown to the instructor, they trade places. Ironically, the marks Mr. Warren gets for his brother are higher than his own.

Aircraft Shortages at Flying School

Aircraft Shortages at Flying School

Mr. Warren describes a shortage of Anson aircraft at Elementary Flying School in High River Alberta. His tongue-in-cheek sense is that more value was placed on recovering the wheels from a downed aircraft than on its pilot. Later, at RAF flying school in Medicine Hat, he retrains in a single engine Harvard which eventually leads him to becoming a fighter pilot.

Air Cover at Dieppe

Air Cover at Dieppe

Mr. Warren discusses the air battle over Dieppe, and the deterrent effect of Allied fighters. He goes on to cite the number of aircraft lost, and explains the discrepancy between claimed and verified German losses on that day.

Value of his Ground Crew

Value of his Ground Crew

Mr. Warren discusses the importance of his ground crew, and his sense that they were responsible for his safely completing his tour of duty.

Fuel was Critical

Fuel was Critical

Mr. Warren describes several of his combat tasks; sweeps (searching for targets of opportunity), dogfighting and bomber escort. The length of these missions was short due to the Spitfire's small fuel capacity and high consumption rate.

The Spitfire was A Poor Night Fighter

The Spitfire was A Poor Night Fighter

Mr. Warren is in one of three squadrons trained for night fighting. He describes being nearly blinded by flames from his Spitfire's exhaust ports, which made takeoff and landing very difficult.

The New Spitfire 9

The New Spitfire 9

Mr. Warren receives a newer Spitfire 9 fighter which is the equal of German fighter aircraft. The new Spitfire can fly at much higher altitude, and with its auxiliary fuel tanks, has a much greater combat range.

Radar Operated Rear Turret - Testing

Radar Operated Rear Turret - Testing

Mr. Warren becomes involved in the testing of a new radar operated gun in a rear bomber turret. His role is to act as the enemy fighter while tests are run on the new radar's accuracy. Mr. Warren is impressed by how well the new technology works.

Radar Operated Rear Turret – Fatal Flight

Radar Operated Rear Turret – Fatal Flight

Mr. Warren is returning to base in formation with the radar equipped bomber, when the bomber suddenly drops its nose and plunges into a pasture, killing all aboard. Sadly, this was to have been the crew's last tour of duty.

Sweeps at the Falaise Gap

Sweeps at the Falaise Gap

Mr. Warren pilots the modified Spitfire 9B, equipped for low level warfare. He describes, with regret, attacking German horse-drawn equipment, as well as the fact anything on the road was fair game. He expresses admiration for German motorcycle riders who were particularly vulnerable to air attack.

A Very Close Call

A Very Close Call

Mr. Warren's Spitfire is struck by shrapnel or ack-ack, leaving a hole in the cockpit and him with a numb leg. He jettisons his bombs and returns to base. Smelling something burning, his investigation finds a piece of molten metal in a tin box in his tunic pocket. During this clip, Mr. Warren also explains why Spitfire pilots seldom ejected if their plane was shot down.

Perspectives on Death and Danger

Perspectives on Death and Danger

Mr. Warren differentiates between how ground and air forces might view targeting the enemy. He also compares the perspectives of ground and air forces in terms of proximity to the enemy.

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