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206 results returned within regiment Royal Rifles of Canada
One  Big Family

One Big Family

Mr. Lecouffe has high esteem for his fellow soldiers, especially those raw untrained recruits from the inner cities, as well as for his association. He regards them all as family.

Food Drops

Food Drops

Mr. Lecouffe notes a new friendliness among the Japanese guards, only to find that they all soon disappear. The Americans begin a non-stop food drop which Mr. Lecouffe deems more frightening than a real bombing raid.

Risking  Extra Food

Risking Extra Food

Mr. Lecouffe describes sneaking out of camp after dark and raiding local gardens for extra food, which, although suspicious, the Japanese guards were never able to find.

Working in the Sendai Coal Mine

Working in the Sendai Coal Mine

Mr. Lecouffe describes a fourteen hour work day in the coal mine, where the men were expected to meet a tonnage quota of coal every day.

Tokyo is Firebombed

Tokyo is Firebombed

Mr. Lecouffe describes the costly American air raid which leveled Tokyo. Ironically, the camp guards are forced to protect the prisoners from locals incensed by the devastation.

Working in the Shipyard

Working in the Shipyard

Mr. Lecouffe describes being paraded to the shipyard and how risky it was to weld with no eye protection. He has high praise for two of his honchos, who helped the POWs and shared information about the war at risk of death should they be caught.

Voyage to Japan

Voyage to Japan

Mr. Lecouffe describes being in a ship's hold, jammed in like cattle, with no toilet facilities for men still suffering from dysentery. He eventually reaches Japan and is sent to the Yokohama shipyard.

Diseases

Diseases

Mr. Lecouffe describes several of the diseases which afflicted the POWs, and attributes his relative immunity to the vitamin he'd received during his recent recuperation.

Chronic Diarrhea

Chronic Diarrhea

Mr. Lecouffe survives a near death experience with chronic diarrhea. As a last resort, he is treated with opium and vitamin injections, which set him on the road to recovery.

Forced March to North Point Camp

Forced March to North Point Camp

Mr. Lecouffe describes surrendering to the Japanese and having to dump a huge store of alcohol. The march to North Point is very difficult because of the heat and lack of water. Mr. Lecouffe witnesses Japanese guards tying Chinese women to a post and slowly bayoneting them to death.

Last Action and Capitulation

Last Action and Capitulation

Mr. Lecouffe describes trying to strafe low flying Japanese fighters. He goes on to describe the surrender of the island by its governor who is faced with more slaughter of its defenseless Chinese population.

Combat Experiences

Combat Experiences

Mr. Lecouffe describes the initial bombing of Sham Shui Po barracks by the Japanese. After being evacuated to Hong Kong, he is hospitalized. On his release, he is re-armed and makes his way through the enemy up to the combat zone, where he joins the Winnipeg Grenadiers.

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