Language selection

A Lesson Learned

Heroes Remember

Transcript
You got a parcel and you shared it with everybody in your section, didn't matter sometimes you didn't get a hell of a lot out of it yourself. I remember I got a big cake one time and I did get a hunk of the icing but you shared it. Well this one, we got in the reinforcements we got a new guy that didn't, he wasn't climatized so he got a, we found that he was taking his parcels particularly when we're out on so called rest, he'd go off some place and open his parcel up and he'd eat all the goodies and that was it but he never shared. They found out, found one of his, they watched for one of his boxes when he discarded and the cover and they went back to the orchard right back of our billets and there was little horses running around there so we gathered a few horse apples, put a layer of horse apples then the boys decided it's not quite heavy enough so a couple of half bricks and another layer of horse apples, put the top on, got the regimental tailor to get busy and he sowed it all up nicely and we told the postal corporal don't deliver it until we're ready to move out. We moved out that night after this was delivered and we had a hell of a long weary hike, it was, we didn't have transport. Those were the transport, those things down there and we went right into the community location trench and into the line. I think we went into, no we went into reserve first. Well here he is looking around, he's looking around for a place, he wants to open his parcel and he's having a hell of a time, he's got, there's no privacy anywhere. Well three of the boys from his section were standing watching when he started to open the parcel. You know I think you know he got the message because it was just about getting pretty ripe about that time.
Description

Mr. Henley describes the consequences of not sharing a parcel from home when sharing was the accepted practice.

Roy Henley

Roy Henley was born in London, Ontario on September 29, 1898. After enlisting in Toronto in 1916 with the 166th Queens Own Rifles, he was discharged with suspected tuberculosis. Mr. Henley re-enlisted, sailed to England aboard the horse transport SS Welshman, and joined the Quebec Regiment. Mr. Henley's recollections are detailed, sometimes graphic and occasionally humorous. His experiences spanned many battles; the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele, Cambrai and Arras.

Meta Data
Medium:
Video
Owner:
Veterans Affairs Canada
Duration:
2:46
Person Interviewed:
Roy Henley
War, Conflict or Mission:
First World War
Branch:
Army
Rank:
Sergeant

Copyright / Permission to Reproduce

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