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Taken to a Safe Hiding House

Taken to a Safe Hiding House

After receiving assistance from a young couple, Mr. Carter-Edwards describes how he was provided with a new identity and began his journey through Paris to Spain.

Running for our Lives

Running for our Lives

Once on the ground, Mr. Carter-Edwards describes how he and his fellow crew member become separated. After a rough few nights fighting the elements, he seeks food and refuge from two french ladies he chance encounters.

Decision to Bail Out

Decision to Bail Out

After Germans ignited the aircraft, Mr. Carter-Edwards and the crew bail out and after a rough landing, he reunites with one of his crew.

Targets and Tinsel

Targets and Tinsel

Mr. Carter-Edwards talks about some of the different duties he had while on a mission; dropping tinsel in hopes of jamming the enemy’s radar, monitoring the radio for communications from base and jamming German radio communications.

Hazards In Flight

Hazards In Flight

During flight operations on a target to Berlin, Mr. Carter-Edwards speaks about the very frightful experience he had exposed to constant attack from night fighters, anti-aircraft and the anxiety felt of mid-air collision.

Forming a Crew

Forming a Crew

Mr. Carter-Edwards describes his role as wireless air gunner and how they formed their crew.

Reasons for Joining up

Reasons for Joining up

Mr. Carter-Edwards speaks about growing up quite secluded and hoped that the Air Force would help him break out of his shell.

Men who Didn't Have a Chance...

Men who Didn't Have a Chance...

Mr. Warren reflects on his good fortune to have survived the war and offers a poignant in memoriam for those who weren't so fortunate.

Reunion with the Dutch Underground

Reunion with the Dutch Underground

Mr. Warren describes suppression bombing in the Scheldt designed to keep the Germans heads down while the Canadian army advanced. Years later, at a meeting in Holland, he is surprised to be confronted by a member of the World War Two Dutch Resistance who had been in the area at the time of the bombing.

Perspectives on Death and Danger

Perspectives on Death and Danger

Mr. Warren differentiates between how ground and air forces might view targeting the enemy. He also compares the perspectives of ground and air forces in terms of proximity to the enemy.

A Very Close Call

A Very Close Call

Mr. Warren's Spitfire is struck by shrapnel or ack-ack, leaving a hole in the cockpit and him with a numb leg. He jettisons his bombs and returns to base. Smelling something burning, his investigation finds a piece of molten metal in a tin box in his tunic pocket. During this clip, Mr. Warren also explains why Spitfire pilots seldom ejected if their plane was shot down.

Sweeps at the Falaise Gap

Sweeps at the Falaise Gap

Mr. Warren pilots the modified Spitfire 9B, equipped for low level warfare. He describes, with regret, attacking German horse-drawn equipment, as well as the fact anything on the road was fair game. He expresses admiration for German motorcycle riders who were particularly vulnerable to air attack.

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