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435 results returned within campaign Hong Kong
Forced March to North Point Camp

Forced March to North Point Camp

Mr. Lecouffe describes surrendering to the Japanese and having to dump a huge store of alcohol. The march to North Point is very difficult because of the heat and lack of water. Mr. Lecouffe witnesses Japanese guards tying Chinese women to a post and slowly bayoneting them to death.

Last Action and Capitulation

Last Action and Capitulation

Mr. Lecouffe describes trying to strafe low flying Japanese fighters. He goes on to describe the surrender of the island by its governor who is faced with more slaughter of its defenseless Chinese population.

Combat Experiences

Combat Experiences

Mr. Lecouffe describes the initial bombing of Sham Shui Po barracks by the Japanese. After being evacuated to Hong Kong, he is hospitalized. On his release, he is re-armed and makes his way through the enemy up to the combat zone, where he joins the Winnipeg Grenadiers.

Not Patriotism

Not Patriotism

Mr. Gyselman describes the demographics of the Winnipeg Grenadiers as he saw them, and indicates that he enlisted not out of patriotism but for the steady employment.

Returning Home

Returning Home

Mr. Gyselman discusses being the first Canadian POW to be flown to mainland North America. He compares the generous welcome of the Americans to the austerity of the Canadian welcome. While happy to be home, he is troubled by questions about other people's loved ones.

Pigs and Tigers

Pigs and Tigers

Mr. Gyselman describes the butchering of the camp commandant's pig, and having boiled pork the following morning. He also describes the daredevil delivery of supplies by Americans flying single seater Grumman Tigers.

DDT and Fleas

DDT and Fleas

Mr. Gyselman describes receiving DDT powder in the American supply drop, and putting it to good use against the camp's sand flea epidemic.

Finally Free

Finally Free

Mr. Gyselman discusses events immediately following the Japanese surrender. His initial reaction is to head for the mine with the intention of knifing his Japanese guards, who are nowhere to be found. Later he and a friend head to town, hijack a truck and go to a Japanese restaurant.

Regaining his Sight

Regaining his Sight

Mr. Gyselman describes enduring three weeks of blindness, and being offered a series of injections of an unidentified serum. Choosing to take the gamble, his eyesight returns after a week.

Last Action

Last Action

Mr. Gyselman is designated a platoon runner who is sent to the front and witnesses a deadly ambush set for the Japanese. Eventually, the enemy regroups and a mortar attack drives the Canadians from their position. Heavily loaded down and under enemy fire, Mr. Gyselman escapes. He later notices that his pants legs are full of bullet holes.

Who’s the Enemy?

Who’s the Enemy?

Mr. Gyselman describes being shelled by miniature Japanese howitzers, which inflicts serious casualties and forces the remaining men to retreat. Escaping along a water course, the men are mistakenly fired upon by their British allies. They show the white flag, and are granted safe passage by the British.

A Stolen Truck and a Broken Rifle

A Stolen Truck and a Broken Rifle

Mr. Gyselman describes commandeering an old truck to be used to transport troops to a new defensive position. Once there, and under enemy attack, he discovers that his rifle doesn't fire.

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