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Wounded By A “Potato Masher”

Wounded By A “Potato Masher”

Mr. Henley describes how the Germans tied several 'potato masher' grenades together to increase their potential for damage, and how he and his officer were badly wounded by one of these devices.

'Not Diagnosed' And 'Self-Inflicted' Wounds

'Not Diagnosed' And 'Self-Inflicted' Wounds

Mr. Henley discusses the fact that soldiers with psychological trauma were labeled 'ND'– not diagnosed. He also describes self-inflicted wounds as a way to escape the front line, and some methods used in self-injury.

Money And A Peep Show

Money And A Peep Show

Mr. Henley describes how the Canadians and Australians kept their distance from one another on paydays, and how he and his kilted buddies would treat the girls at dockside by standing on the ship's upper deck when they were going on or returning from leave.

Whiz-Bang In The Latrine

Whiz-Bang In The Latrine

Mr. Henley recounts with amusement how an officer everyone disliked had the latrine he was using blown up by a German whiz-bang.

Don't Mess With Me!

Don't Mess With Me!

Mr. Henley discusses the status he held as a Sergeant-Major, and how his NCO's rallied around him when his authority was threatened by a new officer.

A Lesson Learned

A Lesson Learned

Mr. Henley describes the consequences of not sharing a parcel from home when sharing was the accepted practice.

Dreadful Living Conditions

Dreadful Living Conditions

Mr. Henley discusses being filthy, living with louse infested rats, and having last dibs on rations if you were in the front line.

Kilts Were Dreadful

Kilts Were Dreadful

Mr. Henley describes two major issues with kilts. The first was that lice thrived in a kilt's seams, and the second was that mud froze to a kilts tail, thus badly chafing its wearer's legs.

Canadians

Canadians

Mr. Henley discusses inadequacies of Canadian gear: tunics that weren't practical or warm, the Ross rifle which jammed after a few shots, and boots and leather belts which rotted in the wet conditions.

Creeping Barrage At Vimy Ridge

Creeping Barrage At Vimy Ridge

Mr. Henley gives an excellent description of the logistics and technique of the creeping barrage and its overwhelming success at Vimy Ridge.

The Somme Was A Killing Ground

The Somme Was A Killing Ground

Mr. Henley describes how the Germans set their barbed wire in such a way that Allied soldiers were lured towards enemy machine gun positions, and describes the resulting carnage.

Joining The Quebec Regiment

Joining The Quebec Regiment

Mr. Henley describes his transfer from a mounted to infantry regiment, and the shocking difference between the two uniforms.

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