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256 results returned within location Hong Kong
Shooting a Fifth Columnist

Shooting a Fifth Columnist

Mr. Gyselman describes the shooting of a Fifth Columnist who refuses to halt when challenged. A search of the body reveals maps of the Canadian positions drawn in ink.

First Action in Hong Kong

First Action in Hong Kong

Mr. Gyselman describes being on sentry duty at a reservoir when it is bombed by the Japanese. One bomb is close enough to shower him with dirt and gravel.

A hint that the war was over.

A hint that the war was over.

Mr. Leblanc recalls the end of the war and discusses the lack of food for the Japanese civilian population.

Beatings by Guards

Beatings by Guards

Mr. Leblanc talks about the Japanese guards and how he felt size played a part in who got beatings.

Trip to Niigata

Trip to Niigata

Mr. Leblanc tells about his journey across the ocean to a Japanese prison camp.

Badly outnumbered

Badly outnumbered

Mr. Leblanc talks about the balance of power and the terrain.

Too Young

Too Young

Mr. Leblanc recalls that when the war started, it was pretty much round the clock fighting until the capitulation.

Lots of Fun

Lots of Fun

Mr. Leblanc talks about arriving in Hong Kong and what it was like before war broke out.

The War Ends

The War Ends

Mr. Hurd describes hearing about the atomic bombs dropped on Japan, and senses that the war is over. His officer challenges the Japanese commandant about his authority, and the Japanese soon all disappear.

No Medications

No Medications

Mr. Hurd discusses the Japanese denial of medications to the Canadian POWs. He also accuses his captors of stealing a relief shipment of food and medicine from the Red Cross.

North Point Camp

North Point Camp

Mr. Hurd describes North Point as a filthy nightmare. The diet consisted of rice contaminated with rat feces, and boiled lettuce-like greens. Yams were an occasional treat.

Surrender

Surrender

Mr. Hurd discusses his officer's relief at the Hong Kong's surrender, as he had felt the battle was futile and would cost too many unnecessary deaths among his men. The Royal Rifles were, ironically, the last Commonwealth regiment to lay down their arms.

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