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256 results returned within location Hong Kong
Marching to reinforce D-company

Marching to reinforce D-company

Mr. Agerbak recounts the start of the battle. (Part 1 of 3)

Fire and Bomb Watch Duty

Fire and Bomb Watch Duty

Mr. Ford shares the story of his invitation to a friend to join him on duty. But his friend chooses not to join him and becomes the first casualty of a bomb blast.

Voyage to Hong Kong

Voyage to Hong Kong

Mr. Treherne recalls getting word the atomic bomb had dropped in Japan.

His Thoughts About The Government of Canada That Sent Them

His Thoughts About The Government of Canada That Sent Them

Unlike his feelings about the Japanese people, Mr. Routledge expresses disappointment with the Canadian Government of the time that sent the troops to Hong Kong.

His Thoughts About The People Of Japan

His Thoughts About The People Of Japan

Most people, given the experiences of Canadian prisoners-of-war in Japan, would have predictable and understandable feelings about the Japanese people of that time - and of today. Most people - but not everyone, including Mr. Routledge.

Dealing With The Experience

Dealing With The Experience

Mr. Routledge made what some may feel were surprising decisions for his life in an effort to put the prison camp experiences behind him. He also expresses his deep feelings that Canadians need to understand what he and his comrades experienced in Hong Kong.

Reunion With The Family

Reunion With The Family

Home at last...alive!

The Return To Allied Care

The Return To Allied Care

Freedom from the nightmare of Japanese captivity comes as the prisoners-of-war are formally handed over to the British.

It’s Finally Over!

It’s Finally Over!

The war ends with Mr. Routledge and his comrades at Canton prison. He explains how they guessed the war had ended, days before they were told.

Little Food Results in Rapid, Large Weight Loss

Little Food Results in Rapid, Large Weight Loss

Mr. Routledge remains at Canton prison for the rest of the war. During his imprisonment there, his weight dropped dramatically.

Canton Prison - Worse

Canton Prison - Worse

In May, 1945, Mr. Routledge was transferred to Canton Prison. He describes this prison in one word.

Hell At Stanley Prison

Hell At Stanley Prison

Back at Stanley Prison, Mr. Routledge and his comrades were placed in the section with the Chinese prisoners. Their rations were meagre. After several weeks there, two new arrivals at the prison, both British officers, eventually brought improvements to their living conditions.

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