Newfoundland National Memorial

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  • 1924

Municipality/Province: St. John's, NL

Memorial Number: 10006-005

Type: Monument (five metal statues, granite shaft, cross and base)

Address: Water Street

Location: The memorial stands in St. John's between Water and Duckworth Streets with the famous old harbour as its backdrop.

GPS Coordinates: Lat: 47.5602781   Long: -52.7110409

Contributor: John Cooper

The Newfoundland National Memorial in St. John's, though funded locally, represents the war effort of Newfoundlanders who were not part of Confederation during either of the World Wars. The maintenance of the memorial falls under the responsibility of the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador.

This Memorial stands in St. John's main street with the famous old harbour as its backdrop. It commemorates all of Newfoundland's wartime achievements on land and sea. The Royal Newfoundland Regiment, the Royal Naval Reserve, the Mercantile Marine and the Forestry Corps are each represented by lifelike bronze figures. Above, on a granite pedestal, a female figure representing freedom holds aloft a torch.

The monument is at the back of a semicircular wall of granite approached by wide stone steps. Flowers in stone urns flank the approach and fine shade trees have been planted about the dais.

In 2019, it was designated a National Historic Site based on the artistic significance and the fact that the memorial was inspired by John McCrea’s famous poem, In Flanders Fields. The National War Memorial in St. John’s opened on July 1, 1924. That was fifteen years before the National War Memorial was built in Ottawa.

Britain's "oldest colony" sent 8,500 soldiers and sailors abroad in the First World War, out of a population of less than 250,000, over 1,500 gave their lives. The Memorial was unveiled by Field Marshall Haig on the anniversary of Newfoundland's great First World War battle at Beaumont Hamel. Since joining Canada in 1949 as the tenth province, Newfoundland not only observes Canada Day on July 1 each year; she also remembers Beaumont Hamel.

Directions

This Memorial stands in St. John's between Water and Duckworth Streets with the famous old harbour as its backdrop.

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Inscription found on memorial

[plaque/plaque]

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN PERPETUAL REMEMBRANCE OF ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY TWO MEN OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND ROYAL NAVAL RESERVE, THIRTEEN HUNDRED MEN OF THE ROYAL NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT, ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN MEN OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND MERCHANTILE MARINE AND OF ALL THOSE OTHER NEWFOUNDLANDERS OF OTHER UNITS OF HIS MAJESTY'S OR ALLIED FORCES WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES BY SEA AND LAND FOR THE DEFENSE OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE IN THE GREAT WAR 1914-1918. FOR ENDURING, WITNESS, ALSO, TO THE SERVICE MEN OF THIS ISLAND, WHO, DURING THAT WAR FOUGHT, NOT WITHOUT HONOR IN THE NAVIES AND ARMIES OF THE EMPIRE. THIS MONUMENT IS ERECTED BY THEIR FELLOW COUNTRYMEN, AND WAS UNVEILED BY FIELD MARSHALL EARL HAIG, K.T., G.C.B., O.M. ETC. FIRST OF JULY 1924. LET THEM GIVE GLORY UNTO THE LORD AND DECLARE HIS PRAISE IN THE ISLANDS. ISAIAH 42.12

Low quality images in memorial electronic file

Note

This information is provided by contributors and Veterans Affairs Canada makes it available as a service to the public. Veterans Affairs Canada is not responsible for the accuracy, currency or reliability of the information.

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