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Post-Armistice London

Heroes Remember

Post-Armistice London

Transcript
We went wild! I was booked to go over any minute when bingo, it was all over. So as I said before, we just grabbed a train up to London and it's only half an hours run or something like that, Bramshott from London, and they were pulling, opening up the windows and everything was in darkness at night, you know. You couldn't show a light and free beer, free everything. Oh, that was good and I can remember the King and Queen those days paraded down the street. I was out on the pavement and I guess I had too much to drink. I remember some of the boys took a hold of me to kind of quiet me down. I'll always remember that. It was shameful.
Description

Mr. Routhier describes being in London after the armistice and being ashamed of his public drunkenness during a drive by of the British monarchy.

Harry Routhier

The third of five children, Harry Routhier was born in Chesley, Ontario on December 6, 1899. His father was a railroad engineer, and his grandfather has the distinction of having written the lyrics for “ O Canada”. Mr. Routhier's family moved to British Columbia, and lying about his age, enlisted in the 217th Battalion at Camp Hughes, Manitoba. Prior to deploying overseas, he trained in St. John, New Brunswick. Although Mr. Routhier's narrative centers on Amiens, his experiences there are typical of many of the battles which occurred during the First World War.

Meta Data
Medium:
Video
Owner:
Veterans Affairs Canada
Recorded:
July 16, 1998
Duration:
1:06
Person Interviewed:
Harry Routhier
War, Conflict or Mission:
First World War
Location/Theatre:
England
Branch:
Army
Units/Ship:
46th Battalion
Occupation:
Infantry

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