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It made you realize how helpless someone could be.

Heroes Remember

It made you realize how helpless someone could be.

Transcript
Description

Mr. Clark talks about looking after wartime amputees.

Charles Howard Clark

Charles Howard Clark was born in Chelton, Prince Edward Island on November 16, 1924. His father worked as a fisherman, carpenter and butcher during the Depression. Mr. Clark indicates that although times were tough, his community shared its resources and no one went hungry. He attended a one room school. Although he was able to enlist, he, like many local youth, had to stay on the farm as the production of food was vital to the war effort. Mr. Clark’s attempts to enlist in 1943 were at first unsuccessful; he was turned down by both the navy and air force, but was finally accepted into the infantry. However, his stay there was short due to a childhood hip injury, which made marching difficult. He then trained as a stretcher bearer, before finally joining the hospital ship ‘Lady Nelson’ as a nurse-orderly. Aboard this vessel, Mr. Clark made seventeen transatlantic voyages, offering medical care of various types to the wounded who were being returned to Canada. He witnessed the Halifax riots and feels much of the blame placed on the military was unwarranted.

Meta Data
Medium:
Video
Owner:
Veterans Affairs Canada
Duration:
3:32
Person Interviewed:
Charles Howard Clark
War, Conflict or Mission:
Second World War
Location/Theatre:
North Atlantic Ocean
Branch:
Army
Units/Ship:
Royal Canadian Army Service Corps
Rank:
Corporal
Occupation:
Nurse-Orderly

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