Facts and Figures Summary

Summary of Program Recipients

Traditional Programs
Program 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19 Percentage
Change
2019–20
Forecast
Forecasted
Percentage
Change
Disability Pensions 116,031 108,877 101,451 -6.8% 95,100 -6.3%
Treatment BenefitsFootnote 1 79,964 78,752 78,689 -0.1% 81,800 4.0%
Veterans Independence Program (VIP) 90,854 88,286 85,826 -2.8% 83,400 -2.8%
War Veterans Allowance 2,151 1,895 1,650 -12.9% 1,510 -8.5%
New Veterans Charter (NVC) Programs
Program 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19 Percentage
Change
2019–20
Forecast
Forecasted
Percentage
Change
Disability AwardsFootnote 10 63,599 69,694 76,829 10.2% 220 -99.7%
Rehabilitation & New Veterans Charter (NVC) Support Services 11,787 13,233 13,749 3.9% 16,200 17.8%
Earnings LossFootnote 4 11,625 14,870 17,534 17.9% 0 -100.0%
Career Impact Allowance (CIA)Footnote 5 6,011 7,801 12,805 64.1% 0 -100.0%
Canadian Forces Income Support 64 78 86 10.3% 115 33.7%
Supplementary Retirement BenefitFootnote 25 76 79 151 91.1% 7,360 4774.2%
Career Transition Services/GrantFootnote 2 644 741 0 -100.0% n/aFootnote 2 n/aFootnote 2
Retirement Income Security Benefit (RISB)Footnote 6 72 124 183 47.6% 0 -100.0%
Critical Injury Benefit 35 16 9 -43.8% 10 11.1%
Family Caregiver Relief Benefit (FCRB) 277 363 0 -100.0% n/aFootnote 3 n/aFootnote 3
Caregiver Recognition Benefit n/a n/a 661 n/a 640 -3.2%
Education and Training Benefit n/a n/a 1,072 n/a 2400 123.9%
Veteran and Family Well-Being FundFootnote 8 n/a n/a 21 n/a n/aFootnote 7 n/aFootnote 7
Veteran Emergency Fund n/a n/a 686 n/a n/aFootnote 9 n/aFootnote 9

Note: the following programs came into effect April 1, 2018: Education and Training Benefit ; Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund; Caregiver Recognition Benefit; and Veteran Emergency Fund.

Summary of Program Expenditures

Traditional Programs
Program (in $ millions) 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19 Percentage
Change
2019–20
ForecastFootnote 11
Forecasted
Percentage
Change
Disability Pensions $1,331.1 $1,261.2 $1,215.9 -3.6% $1,155.8 -4.9%
Other Health Purchased Services (incl. Treatment Benefits) $590.1 $583.3 $621.6 6.6% $708.6 14.0%
Veterans Independence Program $350.2 $344.6 $342.2 -0.7% $354.2 3.5%
War Veterans Allowance $6.5 $6.1 $5.7 -6.6% $5.3 -7.0%
New Veterans Charter Programs
Program (in $ millions) 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19 Percentage
Change
2019–20
ForecastFootnote 11
Forecasted
Percentage
Change
Disability Awards $700.0 $1,621.4 $1,323.7 -18.4% $108.5 -91.8%
Rehabilitation & New Veterans Charter (NVC) Support Services $33.5 $43.6 $53.2 22.0% $68.7 29.2%
Earnings Loss $269.9 $420.1 $527.7 25.6% $0.8 -99.8%
Career Impact Allowance (CIA) $79.7 $123.1 $189.0 53.5% $0.7 -99.6%
Canadian Forces Income Support $1.1 $1.5 $1.5 0.0% $2.2 44.4%
Supplementary Retirement BenefitFootnote 25 $0.3 $0.3 $0.6 100.0% $53.8 8866.7%
Career Transition Services/GrantFootnote 2Footnote 12 $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 -89.2% n/aFootnote 2 n/aFootnote 2
Retirement Income Security Benefit) $0.5 $0.9 $1.6 77.8% $0.0 -99.2%
Critical Injury Benefit $2.5 $1.2 $0.7 -41.7% $0.9 28.6%
Family Caregiver Relief Benefit $2.1 $2.8 $0.3 -89.3% $0.0 -100.0%
Caregiver Recognition Benefit n/a n/a $6.6 n/a $7.7 16.7%
Education and Training Benefit n/a n/a $12.3 n/a $44.0 257.7%
Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund n/a n/a $3.0 n/a $3.0 0.0%
Veteran Emergency Fund n/a n/a $1.2 n/a $1.0 -16.7%

Note: the following programs came into effect April 1, 2018: Education and Training Benefit ; Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund; Caregiver Recognition Benefit; and Veteran Emergency Fund.

Source: Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services Branch

Analysis of VAC Facts and Figures

As of March 31, 2019, VAC estimated the total Veteran population in Canada to be 639,900, consisting of 39,700 War Service (WS) Veterans and 600,200 Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Veterans. Both the WS and CAF Veteran populations are forecasted to decline through the next five years, but the decline in WS Veterans is expected to outpace the decline in CAF Veterans.

Veterans served by VAC account for approximately 18% of the Veteran population in Canada. As of March 31, 2019 VAC served 15,644 (39%) of the WS Veteran population and 101,049 (17%) of the CAF Veteran population. In addition, VAC provided benefits to 43,184 WS survivors, 11,928 CAF survivors, and administers benefits on behalf of 14,275 RCMP members or former members and their survivors.

VAC’s budget fluctuates each year due to the demand-driven nature of its programs which are based on Veterans’ needs and entitlements. In other words, a Veteran who is entitled to a benefit is paid that benefit, whether 10 Veterans come forward or 10,000.

Overall, total VAC clients (Veterans and survivors) decreased by 1.5% in 2018–19; but this trend is not expected to continue. It is forecasted that growth in CAF and RCMP Veterans and Survivors will slightly outpace the decline of WS Veterans and Survivors, resulting in an average of 0.1% total VAC client growth over the next 5 years.

Pension For Life

April 1, 2019, Pension for Life (PFL) was introduced. Pension for Life includes three new benefits: Pain and Suffering Compensation; Additional Pain and Suffering Compensation; and Income Replacement Benefit. The Pension for Life Benefits package is intended to meet the following objectives:

  • Providing recognition, income support and better overall stability to Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members and Veterans who are living with a disability due to a service-related injury and/or illness.
  • Providing a holistic package that reintroduces lifelong monthly pain and suffering payments; implement a new recognition benefit, and consolidate six of seven existing income-related financial benefits.
  • Addressing concerns raised by military and Veteran communities and families by empowering CAF members and Veterans living with a disability, caused by a service-related illness or injury, to choose the form of compensation that works best for them and their families.

VAC’s 2019-20 planned spending is slightly lower than 2018–19 primarily attributed to the transition to the Pension for Life plan and gradual uptake of some of the Department’s other new programs – such as the Education and Training Benefit. As a result of offering monthly benefits through Pension for Life beginning in 2019, benefit payments will be spread over the lifetime of the Veteran, resulting in lower near term cash payments. That being said, the lifetime value of Veterans’ benefits will increase significantly as a result of these programs.

New Programs at VAC: 2018–19

Career Transition Services (CTS)

The Career Transition Services Program supports the transition to post-service life of eligible members, releasing members, Veterans, spouses/common-law partners, and survivors by providing access to services that will assist them in having the knowledge, skills and plan necessary to prepare for and obtain suitable civilian employment. Services are provided directly to clients through a national service provider.

Career Transition Services (CTS): Approved ApplicationsFootnote 13 and Expenditures
Actuals as of March 31, 2019
CTS Approved Applications & Expenditures 2017–18 2018–19
Approved ApplicationsFootnote 14 - 1,559
Expenditures (in $ millions)Footnote 2 $1.7 $1.6
Career Transition Services (CTS): Approved ApplicationsFootnote 13 and Expenditures
ForecastFootnote 11
CTS Expenditures 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
Expenditures (in $ millions)Footnote 2 $4.2 $5.1 $5.7 $6.1 $6.5

Source: Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services Branch

Education and Training Benefit (ETB)

The Education and Training Benefit provides funding for eligible participants to pursue education and training that will support them in a successful transition from military to post-service life, help them achieve their education and post-military employment goals, and better position them to be more competitive in the civilian workforce.

Education and Training Benefit (ETB): RecipientsFootnote 15 and Expenditures
Actuals as of March 31, 2019
Recipients & Expenditures 2017–18 2018–19
Recipients (Veterans) - 1 ,072
Expenditures (in $ millions) - $12.3
Education and Training Benefit (ETB): RecipientsFootnote 15 and Expenditures
ForecastFootnote 11
Recipients & Expenditures 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
Recipients (Veterans)Footnote 16 2,400 1,550 470 480 485
Expenditures (in $ millions) $44.0 $29.5 $9.9 $9.6 $10.0

Source: Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services Branch

Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund

The Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund provides funding to organizations that conduct research, develop or implement innovative programs that improve the well-being of Veterans and their families. Veterans Affairs Canada has called for applications again in January 2019.

Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund: RecipientsFootnote 8 and Expenditures
Actuals as of March 31, 2019
Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund Recipients & Expenditures 2017–18 2018–19
Recipients (Organizations)Footnote 17 - 21
Expenditures (in $ millions) - $3.0
Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund Expenditures
ForecastFootnote 7
Veteran and Family Well-Being Fund Expenditures 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
Expenditures (in $ millions) $3.0 $3.0 $3.0 $3.0 $3.0

Source: Policy and Commemoration

Veteran Emergency Fund (VEF)

The Veterans Emergency Fund provides funding to assist Veterans and their families during times of crisis and when facing emergency financial situations that threaten their health and well-being. Financial emergencies could include (but are not limited to) food, clothing, shelter, medical care, and expenses required to maintain safety and shelter.

Veteran Emergency Fund (VEF): RecipientsFootnote 24Footnote 9 and Expenditures
Actuals as of March 31, 2019
Veteran Emergency Fund Recipients & Expenditures 2017–18 2018–19
RecipientsFootnote 18 - 686
Expenditures (in $ millions) - $1.2
Veteran Emergency Fund (VEF): RecipientsFootnote 24Footnote 9 and Expenditures
ForecastFootnote 11
Veteran Emergency Fund Expenditures 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
VEF Expenditures (in $ millions) $1.0 $1.0 $1.0 $1.0 $1.0

Source: Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services Branch

Caregiver Recognition Benefit (CRB)

The Caregiver Recognition Benefit formally recognizes the contribution caregivers make to the health and well-being of seriously injured Veterans who require continuous care and supervision, due to their service related physical and/or mental health condition(s). This benefit is paid directly to Veterans’ caregivers.

Caregiver Recognition Benefit Recipients and ExpendituresFootnote 19
Actuals as of March 31, 2019
Caregiver Recognition Benefit (CRB) Recipients & Expenditures 2017–18 2018–19
RecipientsFootnote 20 - 661
Total Expenditures (in $ millions) - $6.6
Caregiver Recognition Benefit Recipients and ExpendituresFootnote 19
ForecastFootnote 11
Caregiver Recognition Benefit (CRB) Expenditures 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
Recipients 640 780 840 890 950
Total Expenditures (in $ millions) $7.1 $8.9 $10.3 $11.3 $12.2

Source: Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services Branch

Pension For Life (PFL)

April 1, 2019, Pension for Life (PFL) will be introduced. Pension for Life includes three new benefits: Pain and Suffering Compensation; Additional Pain and Suffering Compensation; and Income Replacement Benefit. The Pension for Life Benefits package is intended to meet the following objectives:

  • Providing recognition, income support and better overall stability to Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members and Veterans who are living with a disability due to a service-related injury and/or illness.
  • Providing a holistic package that reintroduces lifelong monthly pain and suffering payments; implement a new recognition benefit, and consolidate six of seven existing income-related financial benefits.
  • Addressing concerns raised by military and Veteran communities and families by empowering CAF members and Veterans living with a disability, caused by a service-related illness or injury, to choose the form of compensation that works best for them and their families.
Pain and Suffering Compensation: Recipients
ForecastFootnote 11
Pain and Suffering Compensation 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
Veterans 80,400 85,800 91,000 96,000 100,800
Survivors 1,990 2,210 2,420 2,630 2,830
Subtotal 82,390 88,010 93,420 98,630 103,630
Death Benefits 710 790 880 970 1,070
Total Recipients 83,100 88,800 94,300 99,600 104,700

Source: Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services Branch

Pain and Suffering Compensation: Expenditures
ForecastFootnote 11
Pain and Suffering Compensation
(in $ millions)
2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
Pain and Suffering Compensation $662.6 $681.6 $745.8 $814.2 $882.8
Death Benefits $22.5 $22.3 $23.7 $25.3 $26.7
Total ExpendituresFootnote 21 $685.1 $703.9 $769.5 $839.5 $909.5

Source: Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services Branch

Additional Pain and Suffering Compensation: Recipients and Expenditures
ForecastFootnote 11
Additional Pain and Suffering Compensation 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
Recipients (Veterans) 13,040 15,310 17,580 19,850 22,110
Expenditures (in $ millions) $102.4 $119.7 $137.8 $156.5 $175.9

Source: Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services Branch

Income Replacement Benefit: Recipients and Expenditures
ForecastFootnote 11
Income Replacement Benefit 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
TemporaryFootnote 22 13,300 15,940 18,250 20,060 2 1,440
PermanentFootnote 23 8,480 9,620 10,890 11,980 13,570
Total: Recipients (Temporary and Permanent) 21,780 25,560 29,140 32,040 3 5,010
Expenditures (in $ millions) $628.0 $740.7 $846.4 $941.4 $1,042.4

Source: Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Services Branch


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