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Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Clarke Munro Chambers

In memory of:

Flying Officer Clarke Munro Chambers

March 24, 1943
Terschelling, Netherlands

Military Service


Service Number:

J/12281

Age:

22

Force:

Air Force

Unit:

Royal Canadian Air Force

Division:

415 Sqdn.

Citation(s):

1939-1945 Star, Europe Star, General Service Medal, Canadian Volunteer Service Medal with bar, operational wings.

Additional Information


Born:

June 19, 1920
Calgary, Alberta

Enlistment:

August 14, 1941
Calgary, Alberta

Son of Master Sergeant Wilfred Clarke Chambers and Eva Gray Munro, of Calgary, Alberta.

He was a cadet with the Alberta Military Institute Cadets in Calgary, Alberta, from 1935 to 1937, an infantry soldier with the Calgary Highlanders – NPAM – in 1939, a corporal and clerk with the 8th Field Ambulance of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps – NPAM – from 1939 to 1941.

He served in Canada and Great Britain.

Commemorated on Page 145 of the Second World War Book of Remembrance. Request a copy of this page. Download high resolution copy of this page.

Burial Information


Cemetery:

RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
Surrey, United Kingdom

Grave Reference:

Panel 173.

Location:

During the Second World War more than 116,000 men and women of the Air Forces of the British Commonwealth gave their lives in service. More than 17,000 of these were members of the Royal Canadian Air Force, or Canadians serving with the Royal Air Force. Approximately one-third of all who died have no known grave. Of these, 20,450 are commemorated by name on the Runnymede Memorial, which is situated at Englefield Green, near Egham, 32 kilometers by road west of London.

The design of the Runnymede Memorial is original and striking. On the crest of Cooper's Hill, overlooking the Thames, a square tower dominates a cloister, in the centre of which rests the Stone of Remembrance. The cloistered walks terminate in two lookouts, one facing towards Windsor, and the other towards London Airport at Heathrow. The names of the dead are inscribed on the stone reveals of the narrow windows in the cloisters and the lookouts. They include those of 3,050 Canadian airmen. Above the three-arched entrance to the cloister is a great stone eagle with the Royal Air Force motto, Per Ardua ad Astra". On each side is the inscription:

IN THIS CLOISTER ARE RECORDED THE NAMES OF TWENTY THOUSAND AIRMEN WHO HAVE NO KNOWN GRAVE. THEY DIED FOR FREEDOM IN RAID AND SORTIE OVER THE BRITISH ISLES AND THE LANDS AND SEAS OF NORTHERN AND WESTERN EUROPE

In the tower a vaulted shrine, which provides a quiet place for contemplation, contains illuminated verses by Paul H. Scott."

Information courtesy of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Digital Collection

Send us your images

  • Photo of Clark Munro Chambers– Chambers, Clarke Munro - Flying Officer. Born 19th June, 1920, at Calgary, Altberta.  Entered the service of the Bank 27th February, 1939.  Served at Calgary city branches and others in Alberta.  Enlisted 29th August, 1941, from Calgary in R.C.A.F. Sergeant Navigator in May, 1942; Pilot Officer in June, 1942; Flying Officer in March, 1943. Trained at Saskatnon and Mossbank, Sask., Rivers, Man., and Patricia Bay, B.C. Overseas in February, 1943.  Attached R.A.F.  Reported missing after operations over Germany in March, 1943, officially presumed dead October, 1944.From a memorial booklet prepared by the Canadian Bank of Commerce.
  • The Nanton Cenotaph– In 1926 Albert J. Hart was commissioned to create a memorial to honour the memory of those Nanton and District citizens who were killed in action during World War I. The 6.5¿¿ high statue is of Carara Italian marble and features a soldier at rest, with arms reversed in the position that would have been assumed at the burial of a comrade. It rests on a pedestal of B.C. granite. Plaques list the names of those who did not return from both wars. As well, there is a plaque honouring those who served in the Korean War. The location originally chosen for the cenotaph was next to the sidewalk that linked Shaw Street, Nanton's main street, and the Canadian Pacific Railway Station. This was most appropriate as the railway was well used at the time and hundreds of residents and visitors alike would pass the silent soldier during a day. The cenotaph was unveiled August 13, 1927 by the Earl of Haddington. Mayor J.T. Cooper presided over the ceremonies and R.B. Bennett, who would go on to become the Prime Minister of Canada, gave the principal address. Annual Remembrance Day Services have been held at the cenotaph ever since. With the closure of the railway station and the transformation of Railway Avenue into a major highway, the cenotaph's location became less and less appropriate during the latter half of the twentieth century. With the co-operation of Nanton's No. 80 Branch, Royal Canadian Legion, the Town of Nanton, and the Nanton Lancaster Society the cenotaph was carefully dismantled and the statue cleaned. It was then re-erected in Centennial Park at the entrance to the air museum in time for the 2001 Remembrance Day Service. 
www.lancastermuseum.ca
  • Newspaper clipping– From the Calgary Herald. Submitted for the project, Operation: Picture Me

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