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Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Arthur Norton Hickling Churchill

In memory of:

Lieutenant Arthur Norton Hickling Churchill

September 7, 1915

Military Service


Age:

24

Force:

Army

Unit:

Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment)

Division:

1st Bn.

Additional Information


Son of Edward H. Churchill, of Sandway House, Burnham-on-Sea, England.

Commemorated on Page 9 of the First World War Book of Remembrance. Request a copy of this page.

Burial Information


Cemetery:
Grave Reference:

A. 3.

Location:

MAPLE LEAF CEMETERY is located 14 Km south of Ieper town centre, on a road leading from the Rijselseweg N365, which connects Ieper to Wijtschate, Mesen, Ploegsteert and on to Armentieres. From Ieper town centre the Rijselsestraat runs from the market square, through the Lille Gate (Rijselpoort) and directly over the crossroads with the Ieper ring road. The road name then changes to the Rijselseweg. On reaching the village of Ploegsteert turn right at the church onto Rue du Romarin. At the end of this road lies the left hand turning onto Niepkerkestraat (for only 50 metres), then immediately right onto Zakstraat. The MAPLE LEAF CEMETERY is located 50 metres beyond the right hand turning onto Zakstraat.

Information courtesy of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Digital Collection

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  • Circumstances of Death Registers– Source: Library and Archives Canada.  CIRCUMSTANCES OF DEATH REGISTERS, FIRST WORLD WAR Surnames:  CHILD TO CLAYTON.  Microform Sequence 20; Volume Number 31829_B016729. Reference RG150, 1992-93/314, 164.  Page 345 of 1068.
  • Newspaper clipping– In memory of the men and women of London, Ontario (and area) who went to war and did not come home. Remembered on the pages of the World War One issues of the London Advertiser. Submitted for the project Operation Picture Me
  • Photo of Arthur Churchill– Arthur Churchill was born on the 23rd April 1891 in Bridgwater, Somerset, He was the son of Edward Hickling Churchill. His father owned the Wembdon brewery in Bridgewater. During the war it became the Quantock cannery providing tinned food for the troops. Arthur was educated at Clifton College from 1905 to 1908 and joined Clifton RFC in 1909-10. 

Arthur went to British Columbia in 1913 and settled at Salt Spring Island as an Agriculturalist, but enlisted in the Victoria Brigade on the day that War was declared. He came over to England with the 1st Canadian contingent as a Private in the Royal Canadian Dragoons. On 4th May 1915 he was drafted to France with the Canadian Cavalry Brigade, which was hastily turned to Infantry. 

He was subsequently selected to command the machine gun section; every officer who had commanded the machine gun section before him had been killed.

On the same day that his parents received a letter from him to say that he was about to be allowed some leave, they received a telegram informing them that he had suffered a bullet wound. Vain hopes were expressed that he would recover. He had been wounded by machine-gun fire from German trenches whilst placing a machine gun on top of the parapet of his own trench. Two other brothers were also in service: Edward Archibald Hickling Churchill of the 5th Somerset and Private Harold Archer Hickling Churchill of the 2nd Canadian Brigade. All three had been educated at Clifton College and were very capable rugby players, and for a number of seasons had assisted at Bridgwater Albion, both having served as captain of the club.

Arthur died at Ploegsteert and is buried in Maple Leaf Cemetery, Romarin. 

Edward Hickling Churchill was so saddened by the death of his son that he sold his business and put his money in to stocks and shares just in time for the 20's crash.
  • Photo of Arthur Churchill– Taken while playing for the Clifton Rugby Club.

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