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The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada

In 1910, the 79th Highlanders of Canada were organized in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Ten years later, they were renamed and became known as the Cameron Highlanders of Canada and in 1923 the Royal prefix was entitled, making them the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada.

The Regiment mobilized the Queens's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada, C.A.S.F. on 1 September, 1939. They sailed overseas in December of that year and first saw action when they hit the beaches of occupied Europe during the Dieppe Raid, 19 August, 1942.

On that ill-fated day they were to land at Pourville, about four kilometres west of Dieppe. They were to support the South Saskatchewan Regiment. The daunting plan for the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada was that they were to land 30 minutes after the South Saskatchewan Regiment, push beyond the village of Pourville, occupy a German airfield, destroy a German Battery, and finally connect with allied tanks and raid a German Headquarters south of Pourville. These tasks would have been impossible for any troop in the Second World War. In reality, the events did not go as planned and the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada were stopped well short of the town and were faced with enemy fire. When the Dieppe Raid came to an end the Regiment had lost 76 brave soldiers.

In July 1944, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada were stationed in northwestern Europe and remained there until the end of the Second World War, when they returned home to Canada. They were disbanded on 30 November 1945.

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