The Royal Regiment of Canada

Though the Royal Regiment of Canada was originally formed on 14 March 1862, the Regiment as we know it today had its origins in 1936 as a result of the amalgamation of two previously existing units, the Royal Grenadiers and the Toronto Regiment. The Regiment was formed based on concerns about possible American invasion, following the outbreak of the Civil War in the United States. It was first known as the 10th Battalion Volunteer (Infantry) Canada and is the 5th oldest regiment in the country, as well as one of the country's Senior Militia Infantry Regiments.

The Regiment, which was based out of the Fort York Armoury in Toronto, Ontario, was first sent into combat during the North West Rebellion in 1885. It went on to serve at the turn of the century in the South African War as well as in the First and Second World Wars. The Regiment mobilized the Royal Regiment of Canada, C.A.S.F. on 1 September 1939, when the Second World War broke out. They moved to Iceland in June 1940 and to the United Kingdom in October 1940.

The Royals, as they became known, were a part of the Dieppe Raid on 19 August 1942. They were to land at Puys, just east of Dieppe, armed with machine guns and mortars, and begin the battle in the darkness of the night. To their dismay, however, they arrived on shore as the sun was rising, leaving them as no surprise to their German enemies, who were waiting, strategically placed and heavily armed, ready to fire. By the end of the Dieppe Raid, the Royal Regiment of Canada had suffered almost 500 casualties and prisoners of war, 227 of which were fatal. The Royals proved to have the highest casualty rate of all the participating units.

Over the next few years, as the war continued, the Royal Regiment of Canada rebuilt and trained as they continued to fight overseas, for peace and freedom.

On 31 December 1945, after the Second World War had come to an end, the Royal Regiment of Canada was disbanded and reverted back to Reserve status.

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